San Antonio, Then and Now (Image heavy)

135,533 Views | 467 Replies | Last: 11 mo ago by Poot
p_bubel
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Got another batch going.



Joske's in 1892.

They say the original facade is still under the Art-Deco one. (It did receive a couple of more stories after the originally photo was taken in 1892)
p_bubel
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Quarry Market
p_bubel
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Alamo Plaza in 1890.

Previous post office,center, Maverick Building, left, and the General Store built on top of the Long Barracks on the right.

Losing that Post Office was a real travesty, along with the Maverick Building.

[This message has been edited by p_bubel (edited 7/8/2012 10:05p).]
p_bubel
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Streetcar 245 on Broadway at Patterson Ave. (1929)

Faux Bois Concrete Shelter by Dionicio Rodriguez. He did a lot of work here in town, you've probably spotted his stuff at Breckenridge Park, Sunken Gardens or at the old Stone Werks.

[This message has been edited by p_bubel (edited 7/8/2012 10:10p).]
p_bubel
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The first Alamo Heights School. Sometime around 1909.
p_bubel
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That's probably it for tonight, got some more to work on.
AggieDarlin
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AG
awesome. thanks!
Speedbird087
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AG
CCHS as well.

The original TMI campus (at least from my recollection) had a neat, old school feel about it - the historicaerials.com website is good place to see what it once look like. Used to play bball in their rickety old gym.
p_bubel
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OK, a couple of more. One for especially for my Central kinfolk:



I really need a better wide angle lens. It is VERY difficult to get most of these shots lined up these days. The trees downtown make is especially hard.

quote:
St Mary's Institute, also known later as St Mary's College/Central Catholic.
First founded in 1852, the Marianists started one of the fist schools in the city and state. The building is now home to La Mansion del Rio.


[This message has been edited by p_bubel (edited 7/9/2012 12:22a).]
p_bubel
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San Fernando, around the 1870s.

The original is probably one of my favorite early photos in my collection thus far.
p_bubel
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The Old Maverick Home Site and Building, 1918.

The corner of Houston and Alamo Streets marked the northwest wall of the old Alamo compound. One of two structures still named after the Mavericks on Houston Street, Samuel Maverick, signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence, built a two-story house on this site in 1850. Later he built this bank which was torn down to make way for the Woolworth Building you see today.

The Maverick family developed much of Alamo Plaza and Houston Street in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

I absolutely loathe this part of Alamo Plaza today. The carnival atmosphere is downright disrespectful in my opinion.

<off soap box>

[This message has been edited by p_bubel (edited 7/9/2012 12:27a).]
p_bubel
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Main Plaza with the Frost and Brother Store in 1885. Frost Building next to San Fernando with the Wolfson Store on the second to the right which recently burned down, and the White Elephant Saloon on the far right.

Is this photo too big? Balancing useability and detail is tough for me.
p_bubel
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...for tonight. I think I have around 10 more that I took this morning that need to get finished.

[This message has been edited by p_bubel (edited 7/9/2012 12:34a).]
p_bubel
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A couple more:



The Nat Lewis Mill (his home is one of the first in the previous group of images) and the Navarro St Bridge. (previously the "Mill Bridge")
p_bubel
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Southwest corner of Main Plaza.
p_bubel
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E. Houston St (1878)
p_bubel
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Damn it. I just realized I have a mouse curser in two of the last batch. Whoops.
AAM02
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AG
I thought they were paper airplanes.
Cowboy Curtis
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taz997
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AG
Great thread. I am a distant relative of John Twohig and my parents (as well as Aunts/Uncles) have some cool antiques from him.

I wish my family still owned that prime real estate down on the river, though. Unfortunately, some other relatives along the way squandered his fortune after his death.
spankfloyd
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AG
Great thread. I love old photos of SATX.
spankfloyd
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AG



Old MK&T Railroad Depot West of Flores at Cesar Chavez (formerly Durango).


Now a La Quinta.

[This message has been edited by spankfloyd (edited 1/3/2013 4:18p).]
spankfloyd
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AG
One just up the street from the office:

The old San Antonio & Aransas Pass RR Depot. Torn down in 1939.

Replaced with this some time later.


I would love to see some old photos of the area near here (S. Flores @ S. Alamo). I've never been able to locate any online. The Sanborns look interesting though.
taz997
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AG
Nicely done! John Twohig was my paternal grandmother's Uncle. He was a real larger than life Texas Patriot.
John '81
p_bubel
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Aransas Pass RR is on the "to do" list...and yes Twohig was a real badass.

Got some more coming shortly.
p_bubel
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San Pedro Creek at the Dolorosa Street crossing looking north. (1870s) In the distance is the West Commerce St Bridge. The property on the right is behind the Spanish Governor's Palace.
p_bubel
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-Grand Opera House (1888)

The Grand Opera House (Alamo Plaza) 1888. Torn down to make way for a department store, which then was torn down to make way for exposing some of the outer walls of the Alamo compound and hotel entrance

This one threw me for a bit till I realized that the building on the right has a relative twin across Crockett St. Which is still standing. (It's currently a Pizza Hut)
p_bubel
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Moore Building (1904)

Moore Building, Houston St at Broadway. (1904)
Supposedly the car on the left is Ayer's (Architect of many significant buildings in San Antonio), and one of the first in town.
p_bubel
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Temple Beth-El (1877)

Temple Beth-El, Travis Park. (1877)
One of two Temples at this site. The second was razed when the congregation moved better digs in Tobin Hills.
p_bubel
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Dr. George Frederick Marnoch Home. Helotes. The land was purchased in 1858 by the Scottish surgeon and the the home built shortly after. The land lies along the old cattle trail from Bandera to the markets in San Antonio.

[This message has been edited by p_bubel (edited 3/7/2013 9:30p).]
Burdizzo
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AG
The Moore Building has an interesting cupola. I wonder what that was for.

And I think the Ripleys and Wax Museum are an affront to the dignity of The Alamo.
p_bubel
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I dunno yet, but I figured out why it was removed:

MOORE BUILDING & NEW MOORE BUILDING, 1904
Atlee Ayres, Architect

Ayres had his office in this building. The sixth floor was added in 1909 and the New Moore Building, identifiable as the eastmost section, was constructed in 1912. Once completely painted gray, it was renovated for office use in the mid-1980s by the Urban Design Group. An atrium was constructed and the brick-and-terra cotta facades restored.
p_bubel
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It was a roof garden. Pretty cool.

Inscription on back of original photo:

by Atlee B. Ayres: ...first large fireproof building with roof garden / C. A. Coughlin and Atlee B. Ayres, architects / Date about 1904 / auto in picture was my property. It was 8th car in San Antonio.

UTSA digital collection
p_bubel
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Boom

Pretty cool. Thanks for spurring me to look that up.


Picteresque San Antonio Photo Book

[This message has been edited by p_bubel (edited 3/9/2013 12:16p).]
p_bubel
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By the way, that photo book linked above is awesome.
 
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