Story Poster
Discussion: 40-31
Rod Bernstine Q&A
Texas A&M Football

Aggie Football Top 100: Nos. 40-31

May 12, 2015
18,020

There was the Haskell Hurricane. There were the Blitz Brothers. There was Tank. Actually, there were two tanks.

There was DaMonster, Stonewall, Johnny Football and an array of Junction Boys.

In more than a century of college football, Texas A&M has produced hundreds of great — sometimes legendary — football players.

But who are the 100 best?

A TexAgs panel that includes coaches, former players, A&M football historians and media members were tasked with compiling the list of A&M’s 100 greatest players and ranking them in order. The Top 100 will be revealed in groups of 10 over the next two weeks.

Today we reveal Nos. 40 to 31.


40. Bubba Bean, 1972-75, RB (595): Earnest Ray Bean came from Kirbyville to make an immediate impact at A&M. A four-year starter, Bean led the Aggies in rushing in ’73, ’74 and ’75. He rushed for 2,846 yards in his A&M career, which was a record when he left. It remains the seventh-highest rushing total in school history. Named All-Southwest Conference in ’74 and ’75, Bean was a first-round selection of the Atlanta Falcons in the 1976 NFL Draft. He was with the Falcons for four seasons, but was hampered by a knee injury.

39. Dennis Goehring, 1954-56, G (602): Called one of the biggest of the smallest guards in the Southwest Conference, Goehring was twice named All-SWC and was an All-American in 1956. One of the famed “Junction Boys,” he was one of coach Paul “Bear” Bryant’s favorite players and one of his toughest.

Texas A&M Media Relations Hargett stood as one of the best quarterbacks in the school's history for more than a decade — before the era of big passing offenses.
38. Edd Hargett, 1966-68, QB (605): An All-Southwest Conference pick in 1967 and 68, Hargett led the Aggies to the ’67 SWC championship – their first championship in 11 years. He passed for 5,379 yards in his three-year career, which stood as an A&M record until passed by Kevin Murray.

He’s largely remembered for a last-play, 15-yard game-winning touchdown run to defeat Texas Tech 28-24 and start a seven-game winning streak that included a Cotton Bowl victory over Alabama. He played five NFL seasons with the New Orleans Saints and Houston Oilers.

37. Rod Bernstine, 1983-86, TE (608): Arguably the best tight end in A&M history, Bernstine was actually a converted fullback. He was a star running back at Bryan High School, but was moved to tight end before his sophomore season. Originally, Bernstine was unhappy with the change. However, it turned out to be a wise move.  He led the Aggies in receiving in ’86 with 65 catches for 710 yards and five touchdowns. Bernstine had 105 career receptions and eight career touchdown catches. He was named All-Southwest Conference in 1986.

Bernstine was selected in the first round of the 1987 NFL Draft by the San Diego Chargers. He played nine NFL seasons with the Chargers and Denver Broncos.

T-35. Bob Smith, 1949-51, FB (622): Although he played more than 60 years ago, Smith still holds the A&M single-game rushing record with 297 yards against SMU in 1950. That year he became the first Aggie to rush for 1,000 yards (1,302) in a single season — a total that remains the fifth-highest in A&M history. Smith was one of only eight players to rush for 1,000 yards in ’50. A two-time All-Southwest Conference pick, he rushed for 2,415 yards and 23 touchdowns in his A&M career. He was selected in the fourth round of the 1951 NFL Draft by the Cleveland Browns. He eventually played two seasons with the Detroit Lions.

T-35. Greg Hill, 1991-93, RB (622): Named All-Southwest Conference all three years of his A&M career, Hill debuted with a 212-yard rushing performance against LSU in 1991. That remains an NCAA record for a freshman debut. He exceeded 1,000 yards rushing in each of his first two seasons. Hill rushed for 3,262 yards (third all-time) and scored 33 touchdowns (fifth all-time) in his career. He reached 2,000 rushing yards faster than any running back in Southwest Conference history. Hill passed up his senior season to enter the 1994 NFL Draft and was a first-round selection of the Kansas City Chiefs. He played six NFL seasons with three teams.

One of the main figures on Texas A&M’s 1939 national championship team, Robnett was a powerful blocker who led the way for Heisman Trophy runner-up Jarrin’ John Kimbrough. In fact, Robnett finished ninth in the 1940 Heisman voting. {"Module":"quote","Alignment":"right","Quote":"One of the main figures on Texas A\u0026M’s 1939 national championship team, Robnett was a powerful blocker who led the way for Heisman Trophy runner-up Jarrin’ John Kimbrough. In fact, Robnett finished ninth in the 1940 Heisman voting.","Author":""}
34. Marshall Robnett, 1938-40, G (634): One of the main figures on Texas A&M’s 1939 national championship team, Robnett was a powerful blocker who led the way for Heisman Trophy runner-up Jarrin’ John Kimbrough. In fact, Robnett finished ninth in the 1940 Heisman voting. He was All-Southwest Conference in ’39 and ’40 and a consensus All-American in ’40. Robnett was a sixth-round selection of the Chicago Cardinals in the 1941 NFL Draft. He played three NFL seasons.

33. Shane Lechler, 1996-99, P (637):  Punters aren’t usually held in such high esteem, but Lechler may be the best punter ever. He was a three-time All-Big 12 selection and twice was named All-American. He holds A&M punting records for season average (47.0) and career average (44.7). His career punting average is an NCAA record. He had six career punts of 69 yards or longer and 38 “coffin-corner” kicks in his final two seasons at A&M. Lechler was selected in the fifth round of the 2000 NFL Draft by the Oakland Raiders. He’s played 15 seasons with the Raiders and Houston Texans and has been named All-Pro nine times.

32. Curtis Dickey, 1976-79, RB (650): Perhaps the fastest player ever at A&M. Dickey, a local kid from Bryan, posted the second-highest career rushing total in school history with 3,703 yards. He was named All-Southwest Conference in 1978 when he rushed for 1,146 yards. He also led the Aggies in rushing in ’79 with 894 yards. He scored 34 career rushing touchdowns, which is tied for the fifth-highest total in school history. Dickey was selected in the first round of the 1980 NFL Draft by the Baltimore Colts. He played seven NFL seasons with Colts and Cleveland Browns.

31. Bill Hobbs, 1966-68, LB (693): A dominant force on the ’67 Southwest Conference championship team, Hobbs was a two-time All-American and two-time All-SWC selection. He holds the school record for the longest interception return — 100 yards against TCU in 1967. Hobbs posted 11 career interceptions, including seven in ’67. That season he was named National Defensive Player of the Year and Southwest Conference Defensive Player of the Year and was named one of three Outstanding Players in A&M’s 20-16 Cotton Bowl victory over Alabama. He was selected in the eighth round of the 1969 NFL Draft by the Philadelphia Eagles. He played four seasons in the NFL and two in the World Football League.

The Aggie Football Top 100

About the rankings

Panelists include: Jackie Sherrill, Jimmy Wright, Dave Elmendorf, Dennis Goehring, Hugh McElroy, Rusty Burson, Mike Henderson, Tom Turbiville, Brad Marquardt, Bob Spoede, Chip Howard, David Sandhop, Gabe Bock and Olin Buchanan.

Rankings were compiled by a points list in which 100 points were awarded first place, 99 for second place, etc. After a 13-vote total was accumulated, the point values of the highest and lowest votes were eliminated to determine a final point score. Each individual’s final point score is in parentheses.
Discussion from...

Aggie Football Top 100: Nos. 40-31

12,536 Views | 6 Replies | Last: 6 yr ago by coupland boy
Olin Buchanan
How long do you want to ignore this user?
Staff
S
Aggie Football Top 100: Nos. 40-31
stantheman01
How long do you want to ignore this user?
AG
Lechler
Heisenberg01
How long do you want to ignore this user?
AG
Shane Lechler being higher than Greg Hill and Coryatt is beyond ridiculous. He was a great punter no doubt, but come on...
czar_iv
How long do you want to ignore this user?
AG
nm
94chem
How long do you want to ignore this user?
Lechler did make the most important play in the Bonfire game. Some of you are forgetting how important the punter was with RC's offenses. We don't win the '98 title without Lechler (thank goodness he didn't have to play QB!).
AgSpirit581
How long do you want to ignore this user?
AG
quote:
Shane Lechler being higher than Greg Hill and Coryatt is beyond ridiculous. He was a great punter no doubt, but come on...


That's right, he's a great punter. He's the kind of punter that can flip the field. The kind of punter that can bail out the offense when they stagnate. That's a very valuable commodity that most college teams don't have.
coupland boy
How long do you want to ignore this user?
AG
Lechler certainly deserves to be as high as he is. What he did consistently was ridiculous.
Refresh
Page 1 of 1
 
×
subscribe Verify your student status
See Subscription Benefits
Trial only available to users who have never subscribed or participated in a previous trial.