CSA service records for ancestors

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Rexter
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Post your pics and history if you know it.

Here is what I have come up with for my family.

My ggg grandfather:



His brother:



All of the brothers' records. List of all who served is at bottom of first photo under "note".



ItsA&InotA&M
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Isaac Ginn.

Enlisted 6 Jun 1863 -transferred
to Co C, 7th Cavalry - sent on detail for re-mount
Nov 1864 - still looking for a horse at end of war!

Six months later he was still looking for the horse.
HollywoodBQ
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AG
Very cool stuff. Thanks for sharing.

Question about the naming of the Brigades after a person. Was that a common custom during the Civil War, and before or after?

If the commander changed, did they rename the unit?
Nagler
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Harris, Japhet N., Pvt. Co. I. 31st La. Inf. En. March 16, 1862, Monroe, La. Roll for Jan. and Feb., 1863, Present. Federal Rolls of Prisoners of War, Captured and Paroled Vicksburg. Miss., July 4, 1863. On List dated Hdqrs. Allen's Brigade, Shreveport, La., March 29, 1864. On Register of C. S. A. Gen. Hospl., Shreveport, La., admitted Feb. 18, 1865. Returned to duty Feb. 28, 1865.
BQ78
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AG
Confederate brigades were usually named after the commander or if unique like the Texas Brigade in the Army of Northern Virginia just called the Texas Brigade or Texans even when they included Georgians and Arkansans. After the war, they tended to call themselves Hood's Texas Brigade but during the war they would also be called by the current commander such as Robertson's Brigade.

Federal brigades might be referred to by their commander's name too but the official designation was always a number like 1/1/I, which would be the first brigade of the first Division of the First Corps, that particular brigade also went by its nickname of the Iron Brigade (Gibbon's Brigade).
FIDO_Ags
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Nagler, my ancestors were also at Vicksburg, PVT C.E Bauer, and his brother, PVT C.T. Bauer, Waul's Texas Legion. Both captured and paroled at Vicksburg. Both were from Round Top, TX and enrolled in Brenham. Took my daughters to the Railroad Redoubt a couple of years ago to show them where their ancestors fought.
Rabid Cougar
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HollywoodBQ said:

Very cool stuff. Thanks for sharing.

Question about the naming of the Brigades after a person. Was that a common custom during the Civil War, and before or after?

If the commander changed, did they rename the unit?
To add to BQ78 comments... The use of the commanders name was very common during the revolutionary war specially amongst local militia units. You see a lot of Rev War companies referenced as such.

The Confederate Army, initially made up of mostly federalized militia units, continued that practice but utilized it at the Corps, Division and Brigade level.





Rabid Cougar
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AG
Officially have 46 Confederate relatives (Alabama, North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia- paternal and maternal) and 24 Federals (Massachusetts and Indiana - paternal and maternal)

The Muscogee side (maternal) said screw that and stayed in the mountains of Eastern Oklahoma.

Thanks to my Dad for tracking all of this down over his 80 years. Did it old school. Still doesn't have a computer in house. Lots of hand written and typed pages in large three ring binders.

Propane & Accessories
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AG
I know of at least two in my family,

PVT. Thomas Pendergrast, 8th Louisiana Company H "Cheneyville Rifles"

Was wounded during the first battle of Winchester, while recovering he was captured by Union Cav. Was exchanged prior to the second battle of Winchester but did not serve as infantry became a cook due to poor health. Survived the war returned to Louisiana to find his family had died, and he went back to Ireland.

PVT. John W. Bell 32nd Mississippi Regiment Company C "Tishomingo Rebels"

Was a Pioneer/ Sharpshooter in the regiment, was killed in action on November 27th 1863 during the battle of Ringgold Gap or Taylor Ridge. He could've beem killed in its opening move when Skirmisher's from Lowrey's brigade encountered lead elements of Union General Osterhaus' Divison.
Bighunter43
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5 of my 8 GG Grandfathers served in the Confederate forces in a variety of capacities. Here is my GG grandfather RP Ray who enlisted at age 13 (and lived to be 94 and was commander of Camp Ben McCullough later in life.....where they held the. Confederate reunions!).

Secondly....I would like to include a piece on my GG Uncle...William P Buck....who was killed when two Confederate trains crashed head on in the dark at Duck Hill, Mississippi....(they were buried in a mass grave)



jay07ag
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AG
Here is really neat letter that my GGG-Grandfather penned to my GGG-Grandmother in September of 1862. You can tell he started writing the letter before he had fought at the Battle of Sharpsburg (Antietam), and then resumed writing the letter after Sharpsburg, where you notice a serious shift in his attitude. I can tell by reading his words that at that point he knew surviving the war was becoming more and more unlikely as the battles had become slaughterhouses, and the shear numbers of union soldiers amassed against them would be a major problem. Somehow he ended up surviving the war mostly unscathed and came home, but he lost his brother, several cousins and many of his childhood friends. I can't imagine what a war like that would do to a man's psyche, regardless of whether you've won or lost. My uncle has the original letter in his lockbox, and he is supposedly leaving it to me (as I am the other family history nerd in the family).

https://russellvets.org/letters/vermillion1.html
sonnysixkiller
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Would like to look up some of my relatives who fought on the confederate side what is a good website to get started ?
JABQ04
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Fold3. But it's a paid website.
ja86
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Thank you all for posting, very interesting.
Rabid Cougar
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sonnysixkiller said:

Would like to look up some of my relatives who fought on the confederate side what is a good website to get started ?
NPS- Soldiers and Sailors Database
FTACo88-FDT24dad
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My direct ancestor is Joseph Tate. Adam and Robert were his brothers. All from St Landry's Parish and a settlement called Tate's Cove, settled by their grandmother (Marie Fontenot) around 1780.

Tate, Joseph

BATTLE UNIT NAME:15th Battalion, Louisiana Sharpshooters (Weatherly's) SIDE: Confederacy COMPANY: D SOLDIER'S RANK IN: Private SOLDIER'S RANK OUT: Private

Tate, Robert

BATTLE UNIT NAME: 2nd Regiment, Louisiana Cavalry SIDE: Confederacy COMPANY:A SOLDIER'S RANK IN: Private SOLDIER'S RANK OUT: Second Lieutenant


Tate, A.H. (Adam)

BATTLE UNIT NAME:8th Regiment, Louisiana Infantry SIDE: Confederacy COMPANY:F SOLDIER'S RANK IN: Private SOLDIER'S RANK OUT: Private ALTERNATE NAME: Adam/Tate

8th Regiment, Louisiana Infantry

OVERVIEW: completed its organization at Camp Moore, Louisiana, in June, 1861. Members were from parishes of East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge, Bienville, St. Martin, St. Mary, St. Landry, Webster, Rapides, and Plaquemines. Sent to Virginia, six companies (508 men) were held in reserve during the Battle of First Manassas. Fought in Jackson's Valley Campaign and on many battlefields of the AoNV from the Seven Days' Battles to Cold Harbor. Participated in Early's operations in Shenandoah Valley, including Seven Days', Chancellorsville and was engaged at Gettysburg.
Cen-Tex
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I have a relative that was an early volunteer with the Plum Grove Rifles (near Plum, Tx). The Texas State Historical Assn states it was formed in July, 1861 as a training unit under the command of Capt Thomas C. Moore. It's members were drafted or volunteered to join other regular units. I've run into a dead end when trying to find out what eventually happened to the unit or what happened to the men in the unit.
F4GIB71
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Henry Stuart Crockett, my GGF was a VMI cadet where the Cadet Corps was called out and fought at the Battle of New Market. His cousin Charles Gay Crockett was killed in the battle. He became a Doctor after the War.

His Brother in law, was Capt John Thomas Howe, 4th Virginia Infantry Regiment in the Stonewall Brigade. He mustered in on April 18, 1861. Virginia was anti secession until Lincoln called for 75,000 volunteers to invade the South. Loyalty in those days was to one's stare over the union (Robert E Lee is an example). He was wounded and captured at Gettysburg, later released in a prisoner exchange, and surrendered with the rest of the Army at Appomattox.

Brothers George Dallas Herring, Owen Lafayette Herring, Thomas Jefferson Herring, and John Sellers Herring (died of typhoid), all with 3rd NC Cavalry. William Henry Herring, 20 NC Infantry, KIA Gettysburg

William McMillan, 2 GA Reserves

William Nathaniel Duren, 10 GA Cavalry Militia

John Peter Arnold, 12 GA Militia

The family was from SW Virginia, mostly Wythe County. I have a book, 4th Virginia Infantry, which includes the Muster Rolls. There were 11 Crockett's in the 4th VA. I'm sure I am related to most of them, but have not done the research to make the connections. Five died, four survived, two were POWs, and one deserted.

I am trying to find a connection to Jeb Stuart. Stuart is a family name going back every generation for almost 200 years.
Raptor
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TLDR: My 3rd GG on my dad's side was forced to fight for Confederacy, escaped the first chance he got, joined Union, was caught and held prisoner, released and rejoined Union to fight again.

Quote:

1st service Henry J. "Long Henry" Heinen 18441927 Private, Comfort 1862 Militia and Company A/B, 3rd (Luckett's) Texas Infantry (Confederate). In the 1860 U.S. Census, he lived with his brothers in Comfort, listing his occupation as farm laborer. The third of the four Heinen sons of immigrant Johann Heinen and Anna Heinen, at seventeen years of age, he was the first of the brothers to enlist, on June 13, 1861, at Camp Verde, in Capt. Buquor's Company A for one year. In a deposition (July 15, 1901) by sister Louise Heinen Lamm in the pension file of Henry Heinen, Henry's sister stated, "He went and enlisted himself. He and my brother August enlisted at the same time. They were not forced to go into the Confederate Army. They went of their own free will."
In May 1862, he transferred to Capt. Kampmann's Company B. He was in Houston General Hospital for a week in September 1862. The company muster roll at Fort Ringgold for November-December 1862 is the last record in his file. The pension file of Henry Heinen has affidavits and depositions from Heinen himself and his friends about the early days of the war:
At the outbreak of the Civil War, the general population of Comfort and vicinity was intensely loyal to the Union and bitterly opposed to secession. They were therefore the objects of bitter hatred from the secession element, by whom they were surrounded, and were closely watched to prevent their escape from the boundaries of the Confederacy. So bitter was the sentiment against the Union-loving element that in 1862 the flower of the population of Comfort and surroundings was murdered on the banks of the Nueces. Their bones bleached the ground for years, till after the war they were gathered and they sleep today under a monument erected to their memory in the town of Comfort. . . . This will show that it was impossible, at that time of intense excitement, to escape the Confederate authorities, and the only way left to the Union-loving men was to apparently acquiesce in the order of things then existing, enlist in the Confederate Army to allay suspicion, and then to watch for the first opportunity to escape across the Rio Grande to Mexico. (Henry Heinen, May 31, 1894)
I [Henry Heinen] was compelled to join Capt. Kampmann's Company of the Confederate Army at Camp Verde, the latter part of 1862. His company was changed to the Rio Grande, and at the first opportunity I had, I deserted the organization, about the latter part of January 1863. I crossed the Rio Grande, went into Mexico, but after a short stay returned to the United States again and enlisted in New Orleans in Company C, 1st Texas Cavalry. (Henry Heinen, April 2, 1897)
I [Thomas Ingenhuett] saw Heinen at Ringgold while he was in Kampmann's Company, and in about two weeks he deserted and came to us in Mexico, and
67
Civil War Soldiers of Kendall County, Texas

we went to New Orleans together. . . . It was very dangerous here at that time whether to be hung or go into the Confederate Army. (Thomas Ingenhuett, July 13, 1901)
After this fight and our loss [Affair on the Nueces River] had become known to our friends remaining at home, they were afraid to undertake a similar escape, and nearly all joined the Confederates, and when near the Union Army, and when they considered it safe, would make their escape. (Henry Schwethelm, August 7, 1897)
2nd service Henry J. "Long Henry" HeinenFirst Sergeant, Company C, 1st Texas Cavalry (Union). Heinen was 18 years old when he enlisted on February 5, 1863, at New Orleans, for three years. He became a corporal in October 1863, and sergeant in March 1864. Captured at Rancho Las Rucias June 25, 1864, he remained a prisoner until exchanged. He was back with his company for the January-February 1865 muster roll, and became the company first sergeant April 1, 1865.
Col. John Ford, in spring 1864, formed a Confederate force to drive Union troops from the Lower Rio Grande Valley. Leaving San Antonio, he first occupied Laredo and Rio Grande City. On June 25, 1864, he defeated a Union outpost defended by the 1st Texas Cavalry (Union)the Skirmish at Rancho Las Rucias (Wooster 1995, 136). Ford reported, "The Yankees occupied the jacals (Mexican houses), a large brick building, and fought from the cover of a large pile of bricks. They also had the advantage of heavy fences. Very soon after Showalter engaged, Cater's and Benavides's battalions were led in, and the Yankees were driven from all their cover. They fell back to the edge of a large laguna, and maintained a heavy fire, which was replied to, but with little effect. . . . Thirty-six of the enemy surrendered. A good many escaped across the laguna, many of them wounded. Some of them crossed the Rio Grande and secreted themselves in the cane" (U.S. War Dept. 1891. Series 1, vol. 34, pt. 1, 10531056).
Heinen's 1896 application for a pension was initially rejected on the grounds of prior voluntary service in the Confederate Army. If such service was coerced, however, an exception could be granted, so he was later approved at $8 per month. His obituary did not mention his Confederate service, just that "he enlisted in the Union Army and served until the close of the war."


I have a few others on both sides, but this was the most interesting and the most detailed.
This post is for Cretaceous Level Subscribers only.

laavispa
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Here is a first-person account by my g-grandfather published in "The Confederate Veteran " vol XVII No 2 Feb 1909

: " While I am writing I want to say that I an now nearly seventy years old, and one of seven boys that my mother furnished to War between the States. She gave a husband also, who was killed by lightning while drilling in the militia. One brother died in the hospital and one was killed at Peachtree Creek, but three of the seven are still living. I was badly wounded at Peachtree Creek, and never was able for duty any more. Now if there is another mother who furnished more material for the war, I should be glad to know. I think the mothers of the war deserve more praise than any others. with no exceptions"


laavispa
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Two after action reports/observations from Peachtree Creek, Ga.

"The regiment formed in front of the works in line of battle about 3 p.m. preparatory to advancing upon the enemy. The regiment moved forward to an old field about 300 yards, halted, and moved by the left about 100 yards across a ravine, where the line was rectified. The command then moved forward, crossing the ravine again, which ran in front of the regiment, in full view of the enemy through an open field of about 600 yards. The evening was very sultry. The charge was made immediately. The regiment moved through the open field under a galling fire from the enemy's works in front, with a heavy enfilading fire from the enemy's batteries on the left with shell, grape, and canister." Capt. Moses Jackson, Co 'K' 33rd MS, after action report 21 July 1864 (commanding, senior surviving officer).

"Our division met with a Serious misfortune on the 20th of July - we charged the Yankees and our Brigade being on the extreme right of the Division we were badly cut to pieces by a Brigade on our right not coming up to Support our flank - over half of our Regt that was engaged was killed and wounded. … Our Reg. Suffered worse than any other, being on the flank and was exposed to an enfilading fire. We lost our Col. He charged waving his Sword until he fell. Capt. Jackson commanded during the balance of the engagement"….Private Mathew A. Dunn Company C, 33rd Mississippi Infantry Regiment, in a letter to his wife shortly after the battle
JABQ04
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AG
John C Beard - enlisted Co K 5th Texas Infantry summer of 1861.Wounded at Fredericksburg in December of 1862. Promoted to 1st Sergeant just prior to the Battle of Gettysburg. KIA at the Battle of Chickamauga in Sept 19,1863



John P Smith- enlisted Co K 5th Texas Infantry summer 1861. Wounded at Gaines Mill June 27, 1862. Wounded again at the Battle of Spotyslvania in May 1864. Either invalided out or deserted as he married the sister of John C Beard in June 1865.


Basil Crow Brashear. Enlisted Co F 5th Texas in summer of 1861. Discharged Fall of 1861 for rheumatism. Re-enlists for Co F 5th Texas spring of 1862. Appears on muster rolls for surrender at Appomattox April 1865

Charles D Brashear. BC Brashears 1/2 brother. Co F 5th Texas. Severely wounded and captured at Gettysburg July 2, 1863. Dies of his wounds in Federal prison camp.

Robert Canon. Enlisted Company E 20th Texas Infantry in March 1862. Spent war around Galveston for possible Federal attacks. Detailed as a hospital orderly. Dies of Yellow Fever during an outbreak in Galveston in September 1864.

John Job Canon. Enlisted Co F 22nd Texas Infantry. Elects we Major in Fall of 1862. Captured and escaped from Federal troops in Arkansas in 1863. Promoted to LTC. Wounded at the Battle of Mansfield and again in skirmishing in Arkansas. Commanded the regiment and ordered it disbanded in May 1865. Paroled in June 1865.

There's a lot more but these are some of the more interesting ones. All work is done by my cousin who has a tremendous love of genealogy. We had several more captured at Vicksburg in July 1863. Only two Union Soldiers in my family. My GGGF was in an Illinois regiment who was discharged in 1865 around Hempstead and settled in Liberty, TX.
JABQ04
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Cen-Tex said:

I have a relative that was an early volunteer with the Plum Grove Rifles (near Plum, Tx). The Texas State Historical Assn states it was formed in July, 1861 as a training unit under the command of Capt Thomas C. Moore. It's members were drafted or volunteered to join other regular units. I've run into a dead end when trying to find out what eventually happened to the unit or what happened to the men in the unit.


Can you give his name? I'll see what I can dig up this evening.
Rexter
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Cen-Tex said:

I have a relative that was an early volunteer with the Plum Grove Rifles (near Plum, Tx). The Texas State Historical Assn states it was formed in July, 1861 as a training unit under the command of Capt Thomas C. Moore. It's members were drafted or volunteered to join other regular units. I've run into a dead end when trying to find out what eventually happened to the unit or what happened to the men in the unit.


Have you looked at this?

http://www.dixiescv.org/ancestor/ancestor-roll-call.html
Whiskey Before Breakfast
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AG
GHF James F. Morris 15th GA INF, ANV


Whiskey Before Breakfast
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AG
GGGF Ambrose Chadwick Co C, 17th Alabama
Whiskey Before Breakfast
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AG
Griff Ginn and my GGGF James Morris looked to both be in the 15th GA. see my post below
BigJim49 AustinNowDallas
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sonnysixkiller said:

Would like to look up some of my relatives who fought on the confederate side what is a good website to get started ?
The museum at Hillsboro Junior College has records of Confederate soldiers!

Got almost a day by day record of 2GGs!

htps://www.hillcolege.edu/museum
aalan94
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AG
My ancestor, being German, was probably anti-slavery/anti-war. He got out of being drafted by being a teamster hauling cotton to Mexico.
Rexter
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Whiskey Before Breakfast said:

Griff Ginn and my GGGF James Morris looked to both be in the 15th GA. see my post below


I haven't seen Griff Ginn in any family records. I wonder if SS Ginn knew James Morris, as they were both from the tri-county area, and both were with Lee when surrendered.
Cen-Tex
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JABQ04 said:

Cen-Tex said:

I have a relative that was an early volunteer with the Plum Grove Rifles (near Plum, Tx). The Texas State Historical Assn states it was formed in July, 1861 as a training unit under the command of Capt Thomas C. Moore. It's members were drafted or volunteered to join other regular units. I've run into a dead end when trying to find out what eventually happened to the unit or what happened to the men in the unit.


Can you give his name? I'll see what I can dig up this evening.
Watson (Watt) Collins
Born - Robertson, Chester Co. Tenn 1817
Died- Texas about 1879-1880
JABQ04
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AG
Not coming across really anything pertaining to your relative or the Plum Grove rifles. Found some similar names but nothing that really points to any one person in particular.
Cen-Tex
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JABQ04 said:

Not coming across really anything pertaining to your relative or the Plum Grove rifles. Found some similar names but nothing that really points to any one person in particular.
Thanks for looking.

I did find that many of the men that were from western Fayette County and in the Plum Grove Rifles served in Hubbard's Battalion (22nd Infantry Regiment)
JABQ04
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AG
That regiment did have one of the more promising leads while I was looking.
water turkey
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My gg grandfather. Captured at Post, Arkansas. Died in Gratiot Prison Hospital in St. Louis. Burred in Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery.




Also, my gg uncle Print Olive, who became a famous cattleman, (George T Wynns's BIL)

Captured at Vicksburg and released.
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